Rachel L. Greenblatt

Rachel L. Greenblatt

Rachel L. Greenblatt

Associate Professor of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations
Office hours: Thursdays 11:30-12:30, or by appointment
6 Divinity Ave. #305 Cambridge, MA 02138
p: 617-495-9828

I came to Harvard from Jerusalem, where I completed my Ph.D. in Jewish history at the Hebrew University in 2007.   My B.A. is from Cornell, where I studied American and European history, skied and was active in Hillel.  I have also studied at the Pardes Institute for Jewish Studies and  MaTan, the Sadie Rennert Institute Women’s Institute for Torah Studies, both in Jerusalem, and spent time living and working in San Francisco.

My research focuses on the cultural history of Jews in Early Modern Europe.  I have a particular interest in communal memory and the relationship between history and memory, which I study by drawing on a wide range of sources, including autobiography, material culture, legal and literary texts, and more.  My current project is a book written in this vein, tentatively entitled, To Tell Their Children:  Jewish Community Memory in Early Modern Prague.   I have published articles on related topics in the Leo Baeck Institute Yearbook and Jewish Culture and History, and have also written entries for the YIVO Encyclopedia of Jews in Eastern Europe and the forthcoming Cambridge Dictionary of Jewish Religion, History and Culture.

At Harvard, I have taught a wide range of courses on various aspects of Jewish history, including Culture and Belief 27, “Among the Nations:  Jewish History in Pagan, Christian and Muslim Context,” a Gen Ed course that also serves as a gateway course for the secondary field in Jewish Studies, and a Freshman Seminar, FS 42s, “Jews Onscreen: An American Story” (previously called, “Jews on the Tube”).   I have also taught on Jewish autobiography as a historical source, and a more general course on Jewish history in Early Modern Europe, currently listed as History 1025.   Also in the History Department, I have taught a Research Seminar, History 81f, “Women’s Voices in Medieval and Early Modern Europe,” and in Spring 2011, I introduced a new Reading Seminar, “History and Memory.”

See also: Faculty, faculty